Viewing entries tagged
tipsforChina

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Tip #4 For China: How to Call a Cab

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The internet may finally be putting an end to problems getting taxis in China: two new(ish) apps have made it possible to call a taxi to your spot in minutes via your smart phone. 嘀嘀打车 (Android and IOS)and 快的打车 (Android) allow users to input their destination either by text or by voice and sends that information to drivers nearby. After a driver accepts the call, the phone number and license plate of the driver is sent to the user. A little Chinese is required, but you can store commonly used addresses and send the request by text, so if a friend helps you set it up you can easily learn how to use it.

Although it may soon be difficult to get a cab without them, these apps saw slow growth since their release in 2012 – the entire city of Beijing had only 15 drivers using 嘀嘀打车 on the day it went online! The companies behind these apps offered cash bonuses to drivers who referred others to the app, and phone minutes to cover the significant data charges drivers incur, but it wasn’t until this year when they started offering 10 yuan discounts on taxi rides that the two apps really took off. 

Of course, there is the ever-present internet problem of how to make this service profitable. Both companies seem to be looking to incorporating online payments as a way to bring in revenue, but neither seems to have a coherent plan. The services are available in major cities (Beijing, Shanghai, Hangzhou etc.) and are continuing to expand, so if they can ever turn a profit, they may be coming to Yuncheng very soon.

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Tip #3 For China: Embrace the Soccer Ball

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Soccer, that foot sport you may remember from elementary school gym class, is an excellent way to meet people in China. There are a couple of reasons for this: you don’t have to speak Chinese to play it, and, unlike table tennis or some of the card games, it’s a popular game that you know how to play.

The hardest part, which is actually pretty easy, is finding a game. Ask some of your (male) colleagues, students, or neighbors if they have a regular pickup game that you can join. (Note: If you’re a woman, they may find your request a little odd, since soccer is, like, so brutal. But don’t let that stop you!) If they don’t have a game, or you don’t want to play with them, try heading down to a nearby university or park on the weekend and hanging out at their soccer fields. When you see a group of friends with a ball, ask to join their game. It’s a request that’s pretty easy to make with body language if your soccer Chinese is sub-par: join the warm-up circle and see if they let you in.

Once you’re in the game, everything should go pretty smoothly. Keep in mind that, as in the US, some players take their games super-seriously, while others are more like your little brother and will tackle their friends. Go along with it, and enjoy your new hobby!

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Tip #2 for China: Bus Crowding. Brought to you by Ashley

chinastrugglebus:

Let me tell you something about bus crowding in China…. it’s absolutely ridiculous. Now, I’ll start off by saying that Haishu, Ningbo is a lot smaller than larger metropolitan areas like Beijing, Shanghai, or Guangzhou. And we do not have a subway station. So the bus is the way to go. Usually, I…

Tip #2 for living in China: forget everything that you know about personal space on the bus. This current AYC'er thoroughly explains the crowded bus epidemic during rush hour time. Ladies and Gentleman, this is an example of what the bus is like everyday during Rush Hour. Heed her words, and know sometimes you may have to nudge an old lady to get out. 

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Photo of the Day

asiasociety : 
 
  Photo of the Day: Savory Sides in China  
  A busy vendor stacks side dishes for hungry customers at an outdoor street market in Shanghai, China on December 1, 2013. (  Tahiat Mahboob  /Flickr)  
  Want to see your images in our ‘Photo of the Day’ posts?    Find out how   .  
 
 Tip #1 for living in China: get used to street food. It will be some of the best food that you have while in China. Don’t let your American halal horror story, inhibit your Chinese street dining!   

asiasociety:

Photo of the Day: Savory Sides in China

A busy vendor stacks side dishes for hungry customers at an outdoor street market in Shanghai, China on December 1, 2013. (Tahiat Mahboob/Flickr)

Want to see your images in our ‘Photo of the Day’ posts? Find out how.

Tip #1 for living in China: get used to street food. It will be some of the best food that you have while in China. Don’t let your American halal horror story, inhibit your Chinese street dining!   

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